Vote for a Video with ClipChoose

With so much video content online, it is important that our students know how to watch a video to learn from it, not just for entertainment. This media literacy is part of the PA Core ELA Standards across the grade levels (look for standard 1.2.your grade level.G, but can be applied across the content areas.

A few weeks ago while browsing my Twitter feed, I came across a new resource called ClipChoose (via @rmbyrne on his blog). ClipChoose is very easy to use. To create a poll, first create a free account. Next, simply paste in the links of up to 12 YouTube videos and post a question. Then share the link to your poll. Participants click the link, watch each of the videos, and then click a button below the video they think best answers the question. The picture below is a screenshot of a poll we used at the TIC meeting last week.

ClipChoose-SAMR

You can also browse ClipChoose for polls created by others. Click here to view a poll someone created to see if students could identify a story told in first person.

ClipChoose is very new and there are a few things that are listed as “coming features”, including the ability to make polls private and to edit polls you’ve created. It’s not a fancy site, but it could be an engaging way for students to practice making meaning from video. As one of the TIC members put it last week, it’s kind of a sneaky way to get kids to engage with content multiple times or from different perspectives.

A few things to think about if you decide to try ClipChoose…

  • At the moment ClipChoose only supports YouTube videos, so it will be most relevant for our high school students.
  • There’s nothing stopping students from voting for multiple videos or from voting for the same video multiple times. I would still allow students to vote, but I’d follow that up with some sort of written activity in which students tell which video they chose and why.

Next time you have several videos you want students to view, consider using ClipChoose. And don’t forget about your colleagues! Try it out on your fellow teachers at CPPD, department/team/grade level meetings, etc., and as always, add a comment below to let us know how it goes.

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YouTube On Your Terms With SafeShare.TV

signThere is a wealth of great content available on YouTube, but unfortunately it sometimes
comes with enough distractions to pull even the most focused learner off task. Enter SafeShare.TV. Simply paste in a YouTube link and SafeShare.TV will give you a link to the same video, embedded in a page that hides all the comments, related videos, and other distractions. You can also set the beginning and ending points of the video, if you don’t want to show the entire thing. You still need to be able to access YouTube, so at this point students won’t be able to view SafeShare links at school from their own accounts, but teachers will be able to show videos or portions of videos without worrying that something inappropriate may appear on the screen.

Here’s an example of a video shown from its YouTube page…

A&B YouTube

…and from SafeShare.TV. Click on the image below to see how the video plays in the “safe view”. (I selected just a portion of the video, so it won’t play from the beginning.)

A&B SafeShare

SafeShare.TV is very easy to use:

customize

Next time you want to show a YouTube video in your classroom, give SafeShare.TV a try. If you have other tips for making YouTube an effective instructional tool, please share them in the comments.